Workers Comp

When an employee is injured at work, the employee is entitled to medical and financial benefits under workers' compensation insurance. Many work injuries involve the back, and an employee may find that chiropractic care is helpful in treating a work-related back injury. The insurance carrier is obligated to pay for all medical costs that you can demonstrate are directly related to your work injury. Laws regarding workers' compensation vary from state to state, but all require the carrier to cover medical costs associated with a work injury. Chiropractic care has proven to be relatively quick and cost-efficient in terms of returning an injured employee to work.

In the event of a work related injury, the first step is to get your injury accepted as work-related by the insurance carrier for your employer's workers' compensation policy. If you have not already done so, file a first report of injury with your state's labor department. In some states it will be your employer's responsibility to do this. If the employer fails to do so, the injured worker may report the injury to the department via a Form 5.

Next, get your doctor to write you a prescription for chiropractic treatment. Make sure that the doctor's prescription and accompanying medical note mention that this chiropractic treatment is for your work-related injury. Avoid activities outside of work that could be implicated in your injury. For example, if you engage in sporting activities such as kayaking or hockey while receiving chiropractic care for your work injury, the insurance carrier may use this information to argue that your activities outside of work are causing or aggravating the injury. If the carrier can prove your injury is not work-related, it can stop paying for medical care associated with the injury.

Attend all doctor's and chiropractic appointments scheduled on your behalf. Failure to attend prescribed medical appointments and treatment can be viewed as medical noncompliance. If you are deemed to be noncompliant with the medical treatment for your work injury, the insurance carrier can petition the state labor department to stop payment for this treatment.

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